Wednesday, 26 January 2022

Importance of Vaccination

 We often develop a lifelong immune system when we have a disease. However, other diseases can cause serious problems and sometimes even death. The purpose of the vaccine is to diagnose the disease without risking it. When we vaccinate, we make a "memory" of the immune system. During vaccination, a weak microbe, piece, or something similar, is added to the body. The immune system then works without making us sick. Some dangerous infectious diseases can be prevented in a simple and effective way. In some diseases, vaccination provides lifelong protection, while in others the effect decreases after a few years and booster doses are needed.

We often develop a lifelong immune system when we have a disease. However, other diseases can cause serious problems and sometimes even death. The purpose of the vaccine is to diagnose the disease without risking it. When we vaccinate, we make a "memory" of the immune system. During vaccination, a weak microbe, piece, or something similar, is added to the body. The immune system then works without making us sick. Some dangerous infectious diseases can be prevented in a simple and effective way. In some diseases, vaccination provides lifelong protection, while in others the effect decreases after a few years and booster doses are needed. In the uterus, our immune system is ready to fight off the various viruses that we encounter after birth. Since vaccines use only a small part of a child's immune system, the immune system is heavier than normal infections, such as the flu. Infants are therefore more tolerant of vaccinations, which includes getting several vaccines at the same time.

When more people are vaccinated against the disease, fewer people will be infected. This protects a few who have not been vaccinated.

With the help of vaccines, it is possible to completely eradicate other diseases worldwide. To date, this has been achieved through smallpox.

During vaccination, the body is exposed to a weak microbe (bacteria or virus), pieces of microbe, or something like a microbe. When the active ingredients in the vaccine come in contact with the immune system, the immune cells and the immune system produced will see a "real" microbe. When an infected person is exposed to the virus, the immune system will provide a faster and better immune response that can prevent infections. This is a valid vaccine that has been obtained through practice.

A good vaccine will provide adequate and long-term protection against the disease. The amount of doses required varies depending on the vaccine. In some vaccines, there is a need for a booster dose later in life to maintain protection. These include vaccines for tetanus, diphtheria, polio and pertussis. Booster doses may be required for walking vaccines.

When the body is infected with a microbe (virus, bacterium, parasite or fungus), it stimulates the production of vital body cells. After a recovery, some immune cells will “remember” these viruses. This is called immunological memory. The next time a body is exposed to the same germs, the immune system will recognize it. The immune system is faster and stronger and can prevent a person from getting sick. This is a function of natural insecurity.

What does vaccination protect you from:

protect you and your baby from many serious and dangerous deadly diseases

Protect other people in your community - by helping to prevent the spread of disease to people who cannot get vaccinated

They are tested for strict security before being introduced - they are regularly monitored to detect negative results after presentation

sometimes it causes side effects that do not last long - some children may feel unwell and have a sore arm for two or three days.

reduce or eliminate some diseases - if not enough people are vaccinated


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